Consider both Jones’s and Pew Research’s essays about the value of a liberal arts education

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Consider both Jones’s and Pew Research’s essays about the value of a liberal arts education. If you had to describe the kinds of arguments each other makes, what seems to the characteristics of each? What kinds of evidence do they use to make these arguments? Which do you find more convincing, and why? – 2 pages please.

Pew Research Center. “The Rising Cost of Not Going to College.”1 Introductory Remarks
The trees of the mountain bring their own destruction.
The oil in the lamp burns itself.
The cinnamon tree is edible, so it is cut down.
The varnish tree is useful so it is cut apart.
All know the advantage of being useful,
but no one knows the advantage of being useless.
– 莊子 [Zhuangzi] (364-290 BCE), Zhuangzi, “Transactions in the World of Men”
When we are young, it’s easy to figure out what to do next. At least, that was my
experience. In high school, I knew what I was going to do after each school day: sports
practice (I was a jock), then eat, then watch some TV, then sleep. And I knew what I was
going to do after high school graduation: go to college. And I knew what I was going to
do after each school day again: go to work (I was poor), then eat, then watch some TV,
then sleep. I even knew what I was going to do after college graduation: go to graduate
school.
Of course, I ended my undergraduate schooling with a philosophy degree. So it wasn’t
much of a surprise to anyone that I went to graduate school. After all, what else was I
going to do with a philosophy degree? Law school, maybe. But anyone who knew me
also knew I didn’t have a penchant for lawyering. And everyone knew I also had no
desire to flip burgers or deliver pizzas. It seems my hand was pretty much forced:
graduate school or bust.